Awards

Langmuir Lecture Irving Langmuire

The Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry of the American Chemical Society presents the Langnmuir award annually at the American Chemical Society National Meeting.

Irving Langmuir (31 January 1881 – 16 August 1957) was an American chemist and physicist, who was awarded the 1932 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in surface chemistry. He was the first industrial chemist to become a Nobel laureate. The American Chemical Society Journal for Surface Science is named Langmuir in his honor.

Langmuir Award Recipients

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2017

Paul Cremer
The Pennsylvania State University
Probing the Interaction of Anions and Cations with Phospholipid Membranes

Frank Caruso
The University of Melbourne
Engineering Particles for Bio-Nano Science and Beyond

2016

Bernard Binks
University of Hull
Rainbow coloured Pickering Emulsions: Behaviour of Pigment Particles at Fluid Interfaces

Robert Hamers
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Diamond at the Extremes

2015

Catherine J. Murphy
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
The Golden Age of Colloids and Surfaces

Buddy D. Ratner
University of Washington
Biointerfaces: Beginnings, State of the Art, and Horizons

2014

Anna Balazs
University of Pittsburgh
Designing Biomimetic Capsules and Gels that Undergo Directed Movement

Helmuth Möhwald
Max-Planck-Inst. of Colloids and Interfaces
From Langmuir Monolayers to Layer by Layer Assembly

2013

Prashant V. Kamat
University of Notre Dame
Meeting the Clean Energy Challange with Semiconductor Nanostructres

Nicholas A. Kotov
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles: FromConcept to Applicactions

2012

Hai-Lung Dai
Temple University
Nonlinear Light Scattering from Buried Interfaces in Colloids and Thin Films

Luis Liz-Marzán
CIC biomaGUNE
Colloidal Nanoplasmonics: From the Building Blocks to Sensing Devices

2011

Steve Granick
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Janus Colloids

Flemming Besenbacher
Aarhus University
Catalytic Model Systems Studied by High-Resolution, Video-Rate Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

2010

Richard M. Lambert
University of Seville
Catalytic Chemistry and Self-Assembly on Metal Surfaces

Vincent M. Rotello
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Engineering the Nanoparticle Interface for Materials and Biological Applications

2009

Jennifer A. Lewis
Harvard University
Microscale patterning of functional colloidal architectures

Phillip B. Messersmith
Northwestern University
Biointerfacial aspects of mussel adhesive proteins and their biomimetic analogs

2008

Martinus A. Cohen Stuart
Wageningen University
Charge-driven self-assembly: Micelles, worms, fibrils and gels

Miquel Salmeron
University of California, Berkeley
Water at interfaces: Adsorption, reactions, wetting

2007

C. M. Lieber
Harvard University
Nanowires, nanoscience and nanotechnologies

M. G. Bawendi
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Science and technology of nanocrystal quantum dots

2006

Arjun G. Yodh
University of Pennsylvania

Thomas J. McCarthy
University of Masschusetts, Amherst

2005

Hans-Joachim Freund
Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Jay T. Groves
University of California Berkeley

2004

Israel Waches
Lehigh University

Darsh Wasan
Illinois Institute of Technology

2003

David J. Pine
UC-Santa Barbara

John C. Polanyi
University of Toronto

2002

William B. Russel
Princeton University

Martin Malmsten
Uppsala University

2001

Malgorzota Borowko
Marie Curie Sklodowska University, Lublin

James A. Schwarz
Syracuse University

2000

Marie-Paul Pileni
University Pierre et Marie Curie

Hermann Gaub
Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich

1999

Hyuk Yu
University of Wisconsin

Mark E. Davis
California Institute of Technology

1998

Bjorn Lindman
University of Lund

Srinivasan Manne
University of Arizona

1997

Matthew V. Tirrell
University of Minnesota

William A. Goddard
California Institute of Technology

1996

Gerhard J. Fleer
Wageningen University

Graham J. Hutchings
University of Wales

1995

Alice P. Gast
Stanford University

Cynthia M. Friend
Harvard University

1994

Eli Ruckenstein
SUNY, Buffalo

Benjamin Chu
SUNY, Stony Brook

1993

Jacob N. Israelachvili
UC-Santa Barbara

J. Michael White
University of Texas

1992

Alexis T. Bell
University of California, Berkeley

Dennis Chapman
University of London

1991

Stig. Friberg
Clarkson University

D.Wayne Goodman
Texas A&M University

1990

George L. Gaines, Jr.
Rensselaer Polytech Institute

Gabor A. Somorjai
University of California, Berkeley

1989

George M. Whitesides
Harvard University

Sylvia T. Ceyer
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1988

J. Lunsford
Texas A&M University

Ron Ottewill
University of Bristol

1987

D. Fennel Evans
University of Minnesota

K. Klier
Lehigh University

1986

Gerhard Ertl
Fritz-Haber Inst. de MPG, Berlin

Benjamin Widom
Cornell University

1985

Eli Ruckenstein
SUNY, Buffalo

Benjamin Chu
SUNY, Stony Brook

1984

J.A. Mann
Case Western University

Mark Cardillo
AT&T Bell Laboratories

1983

Paul Becher
Paul Becher Associates

Paul Weisz
Mobil Research & Development, Princeton

1982

Ernest Yeager
Case Western Reserve University

W. Keith Hall
University of Pittsburgh

1981

Art Adamson
University of Southern California

Robert Madix
Stanford University

1980

Michel Boudart
Stanford University

Milton Kerker
Clarkson University

1979

John Yates
University of Pittsburgh

Janos Fendler
Clarkson University7

For Graduate Research in Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Victor K. LaMer was born in 1895 in Leavenworth, Kansas, and died in 1966 while attending a scientific meeting in Nottingham, England. High-spirited and ebullient, he was an enthusiast for science, an infectious quality he transmitted to his students. He served as an Army lieutenant in World War I and his war-related research during World War II was recognized by the awarding of the Presidential Certificate of Merit.

He was the editor of the Journal of Colloid Science (now the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science) from its founding in 1946 until he was succeeded by Kerker in 1965. In addition to his seminal work on colloids, his fundamental contributions to physical chemistry have found their way into every textbook and university course on that subject.

The Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry of the American Chemical Society presents the Victor K. LaMer award annually at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium. The award is for an outstanding Ph.D. thesis accepted by a US or Canadian university during the three year period prior to the award year.

$3,000 PRIZE

Victor K. LaMer Award Recipients

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2019

Rong Ye
University of California, Berkeley
Department of Chemistry

2018

Kaifeng Wu
Emory University
Department of Chemistry

2017

Chih-Jen Shih
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemical Engineering

2016

Michel Personick
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry

2015

Qian Chen
University of Illinois
Department of Materials Science and Engineering

2014

Daniel Beltran-Villegas
Johns Hopkins University
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

2013

Rafal Klajn
Northwestern University
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

2012

Bo Wang
University of Illinois
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2011

Matthew Helgeson
University of Delaware
Department of Chemical Engineering

2010

Daeyeon Lee
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemical Engineering

2009

Liangfang Zhang
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engr.

2008

Ali Khademhosseini
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemical Engineering

2007

Amanda J. Haes
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry

2006

Jwa-Min Nam
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry

2005

Christy L. Haynes
Northwestern University
Department of Chemistry

2004

James E. Smay
University of Illinois
Department of Materials Science and Engr.

 

2003

Teri Wang Odom
Harvard University
Department of Chemistry

2002

Christopher D. Zangmeister
University of Arizona
Department of Chemistry

2001

Garth J. Simpson
University of Colorado
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

2000

Yunfeng Lu
University of New Mexico
Department of Chemical Engineering

1999

Younan Xia
Harvard University
Department of Chemistry

1998

Darrell Velegol
Carnegie Mellon University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1997

John Levins
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Chemical Engineering

1996

Frank M. Zimmerman
Cornell University
Department of Physics

1995

Vicki L. Colvin
University of California Berkeley
Department of Chemistry

1994

Paul E. Laibinis
Harvard University
Department of Chemistry

1993

Robert D. Tilton
Stanford University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1992

Andrew D. Johnson
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemistry

1991

Antonios G. Mikos
Purdue University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1990

Andrea K. Myers-Beaghton
Princeton University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1989

John M. Vohs
University of Delaware
Department of Chemical Engineering

1988

James P. Ebel
Carnegie-Mellon University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1987

Peter S. Kirlin
University of Delaware
Department of Chemical Engineering

1986

Manoj K. Chaudhury
SUNY, Buffalo
Department of Chemical Engineering

1985

Syed Qutubbuddin
Caregie-Mellon University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1984

Jeffry Harwell
University of Texas, Austin
Department of Petroleum Engineering

1983

David G Welkie
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Department of Materials Science

1982

Mark A. Barteau
Stanford University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1981

Michel Deeba
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Department of Chemistry

1980

Wilson Ho
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Physics

1979

Eduardo D. Glandt
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Chemical Engineering

1978

Frederick A. Putnam
Carnegie-Mellon University
Department of Chemical Engineering

1977

Hung Dah Shih
SUNY, Stony Brook
Department of Materials Science

1976

Felix T. Hong
Rockefeller University
Department of Biophysics

1975

Michele Flicker
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Department of Chemistry

1974

Stephen L. Brenner
Indiana University
Department of Chemistry

1973

W. Henry Weinberg
University of California Berkeley
Department of Chemical Engineering

1972

Donald E. Brooks
University of Oregon
Department of Biochemistry

1971

Edward McCafferty
Lehigh University
Department of Chemistry

1970

Charles W. Querfeld
Clarkson College of Technology
Department of Physics

For Outstanding Young Investigator in Colloid & Surfactant Science

$3,000 PRIZE

Purpose:  To recognize and encourage fundamental work in colloid or surfactant science carried out in North America by researchers in the early stages of their careers.

Nature: The award consists of $3,000 and a plaque.  In addition, up to $1000 will be provided towards travel expenses to the meeting at which the award will be presented.  The winner is expected to deliver a lecture.

Establishment and Support:  The award was established in 2003 by the Unilever Corporation.

Rules of Eligibility

Nominees who are within seven (7) years of receiving their Ph.D. will be eligible for the Award.   Special consideration is given to the originality and creativity of the work and to its potential impact.  The research must have been carried out in North America.

Nomination

Nomination may be made by a colleague or anyone familiar with the nominee’s work.  The nomination packet should be sent electronically by email, preferably in a single PDF file, containing the nomination letter, three letters of support from others in addition to the nomination letter, the nominee’s curriculum vita with a complete list of publications, and reprints of up to five papers, which demonstrate the nominee’s excellence in publication of his or her research work. The nomination letter should contain a carefully edited 25-word citation, which reflects the nominee’s specific achievements.  Previous years’ nominations will be automatically renewed up to the cut off date for eligibility, but you are encouraged to submit relevant updated material.

Criteria:  The judges will consider originality, quality, and significance of the work and its potential impact on current and future research as well as on industrial and commercial applications.

Committee:  Chair:  Prof. P. Somasundaran Columbia Univ.; ps24@columbia.edu
Dr. K.P. Ananthapadmanabhan, Unilever; kp.ananth@unilever.com
Dr. Ray Farinato, Cytec; raymond.farinato@cytec.com
Prof. Nicholas L. Abbott, Univ. Wisconsin; abbott@engr.wisc.edu
Prof. Julian Eastoe, Univ. Bristol; julian.eastoe@bristol.ac.uk
Dr. Patricia Aikens, BASF; patricia.aikens@basf.com

Deadline:  The submission deadline is typically February 1st of each year. 

Unilever Award Recipients

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Nominations are currently closed

2016

Matthew E. Helgeson
University of California at Santa Barbara
Department of Chemical Engineering

2015

Jill Millstone
University of Pittsburgh
Department of Chemistry

2014

Daeyon Lee
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Chemical Engineering & Biomolecular Engineering

2013

Prashant K. Jain
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Department of Chemistry

2012

Liangfang Zhang
University of California, San Diego
Department of Nanoengineering

2011

Ryan Hayward
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Polymer Science and Engineering

2010

Ali Khademhosseini
Harvard University
Department of Health Sciences and Technology

2008

David S. Ginger
University of Washington
Department of Chemistry

2007

Michael Strano
University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana
Bioengineering Department

2006

Bartosz A. Grzybowski
Northwestern University
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

2005

Yunfeng Lu
Tulane University
Department of Chemical Engineering

2004

Christine Keating
Pennsylvania State University
Department of Chemistry